Images of Wounded Knee

(they speak for themselves)

 

 


Modern aerial view of Wounded Knee battlefield. In 1890 the only existing roads (wagon trails) were the two that meet at the fork under the label "Council Circle." The main trail coming from the NE, crossing the creek and then heading more or less SW. The smaller trail heading S across the dry ravine. FYI: Big Foot's Tent as shown above, was actually a heated Army medical tent where he stayed and was treated the night of the 28th.

 


Red letters and arrows show location and direction of the correspondingly labeled photographs.

 


Red letters and arrows show location and direction of the correspondingly labeled photographs.

 

 

 

The following images, and many more related to Wounded Knee, are among the extensive holdings of the
Denver Public Library's Western History and Genealogy Photo Collection.
It is with their kind permission that these images are reproduced here.
The DPL's Photo Collection may be accessed at the Colorado Virtual Library under Digital Collections.


Most of these images required some processing to bring out shadow details.
Also, where there were significant fractures or flaws in the sky area, these were removed or reduced.

 

 

 


Capable of firing an explosive shell or canister shot every six seconds, the Hotchkiss 1.65" Mountain Gun was a light artillery piece with a range of 2 miles.
The canister shot produced a fan shaped spread of thirty lead balls, and was particularly devastating at close range.
Four of these were used at Wounded Knee.

 


A:  George Bartlett, Deputy U.S. Marshall for the Pine Ridge and Rosebud reservations, in front of the post office and general store operated by Louis Mousseau. Bartlett was sent to try to persuade the Sioux to stop the Ghost Dance.

 


B:  View to the west across the valley of the Wounded Knee battleground with slain American Lakota Sioux and burial party barely visible above cottonwoods along the creek, Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota.

 

 


C:  View to the southeast from hill where Native American Lakota Sioux were buried after the Wounded Knee battle on December 29, South Dakota. Includes tepee poles marking location of Sioux camp, men loading frozen bodies into wagons, center, where the council circle was asked to surrender their arms; the army camp was located to the far left, and a photographer with his tripod camera shows in foreground.

 

 


D:  View of the snow covered ravine where many Native American Sioux sought shelter during the fight at Wounded Knee Creek; shows frozen bodies where soldiers fired and killed from both sides of the ravine, a few men with horses, and a broken wagon.

 

 


E:  View northwest (not S.W. as labeled) over the battle field at Wounded Knee Creek, shows the burial party, including a Native American Sioux woman, at the west end of the snow covered camp with frozen bodies and tepee pole frameworks. The mass grave is being dug on the hill where the Hotchkiss guns were used.

 

 


Interior of Holy Cross Episcopal Church at the Pine Ridge Agency, South Dakota, after the battle at Wounded Knee. Shows standing army corp men and a Native American Sioux man with wounded Sioux from Wounded Knee on the hay covered floor of the church -- still decorated with Christmas garlands.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The rest of these are grim.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


F:  View over the battlefield at Wounded Knee Creek, shows frozen bodies of Native American Lakota Sioux on the snow covered ground with the civilian burial party with horses and a wagon in the distance.

 

 


G:  View from center of Native American Lakota Sioux camp to the northeast, across the council circle, after the fight at Wound Knee creek; shows scattered frozen bodies (women in foreground) in the snow, tepee poles; one with a soldier standing under them, a broken down wagon and U. S. soldiers with horse in distance.

 

 


H:  View to the northeast of Lieutenant Sydney A. Cloman, First Infantry, on his horse on the Wounded Knee battleground among the frozen bodies of the slain Native American Lakota Sioux on the snow, including Chief Big Foot on the left. Cloman accompanied the burial party and drew the official map of the scene of the fighting.

 

 


K:  View of the slain body of Chief Big Foot, Native American, Miniconjou Lakota Sioux, propped up in the snow on the Wounded Knee battleground.
U. S. soldiers, civilian burial party members, and a  "Chunk" or "Stick" Stove of the type used to heat the Conical or Sibley army tent are shown in the background.
(The Stick Stove almost certainly marks the location of Big Foot's tent, which was very close to the council circle. Major Samuel Whitside of the 7th Cavalry ordered a stove placed in Big Foot's tent on the night before the massacre. An example of the type of tent stove in use at the time is clearly seen in the image that follows.)

 

 


Officers in tent by fire during the Pine Ridge campaign, 1890 - 91. (Notice the "Chunk" or "Stick" Stove in this image is the same as the one in the previous photograph. This image is courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration)

 

 


View of the twisted frozen slain body of Chief Big Foot, Native American, Miniconjou Lakota Sioux, propped up on the Wounded Knee battleground, Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota.

 

 


L:  View southwest from just outside of council circle after the fight at Wounded Knee Creek, shows men holding moccasins and other souvenirs among the frozen bodies of Native American Lakota Sioux on the snow covered ground.

 

 


M:  View east from council circle of the slain frozen body of a Native American Lakota Sioux medicine man, Wounded Knee Creek, Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota. The body is posed with a rifle.

 

 


N:  View of the slain frozen body of a Native American Lakota Sioux medicine man on the battlefield at the site of the Wounded Knee Massacre, Wounded Knee Creek, Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota. The body is posed with a rifle.

 

 


O:  A civilian burial party stands by their wagon filled with the frozen bodies of Native American Lakota Sioux, in a ravine south of the camp at Wounded Knee Creek. Mounted U.S. Army officers look on from hill above.

 

 


P:  A civilian burial party and U.S. soldiers pose over a mass grave trench with bodies of Native American Lakota Sioux killed at Wounded Knee, Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota.

 

 

 

"Voices From Wounded Knee - Past and Present"

I am very pleased to host this exceptional piece of work by Mike Magstadt.
It is only five minutes long and well worth the few moments of your time.
(Best viewed with Internet Explorer and Windows Media Player.)*

Regardless of whether you have ever visited, or ever heard of Wounded Knee,
you will be touched -- the message is timeless.

* For best viewing results with browsers other than Internet Explorer

Google Chrome users may need to add the "IE Tab" extension to their browser as follows:
       "Wrench icon"  >  Tools  >  Extensions  >  select "Get more extensions"  >  search store for "IE Tab"
       and add the "IE Tab" from Blackfish Software. Then reload this page and click on the "IE Tab" icon.

Mozilla Firefox users may need to add the "IE Tab V2" extension to their browser as follows:
       Tools  >  Add-ons  >  use the "Search all add-ons" box to search for "IE Tab V2"
       Install "IE Tab V2" and restart Firefox. Navigate back to this page in Firefox.
       Right-click on Firefox's "Images of Wounded Knee" browser tab and select "Switch rendering engine"

 

 

Read the Joseph Horn Cloud and Dewey Beard Interviews -- Survivors of Wounded Knee
Click here to read the Joseph Horn Cloud and Dewey Beard interviews, as published by the University of Nebraska Press. The interviews are in PDF format and will require a PDF reader such as Adobe Reader or PDF-XChange Viewer. The file is 13Mb so be patient if you are using a modem -- the wait will be worth it.

Many thanks to the University of Nebraska Press for publishing The Indian Interviews of Eli S. Ricker and kindly permitting this download of the Joseph Horn Cloud and Dewey Beard interviews. These and many more interviews, relevant to Wounded Knee, are included in the University of Nebraska Press publication The Indian Interviews of Eli S. Ricker, 1903-1919 Vol. I -- available for purchase at the following web page:
                 Visit the University of Nebraska Press website at http://www.nebraskapress.unl.edu

I would like to express my appreciation to the Nebraska State Historical Society for the good work they do in preserving old treasures like the Eli Ricker Tablets, and also my gratitude for allowing me to include in the PDF document a photograph of brothers Dewey Beard, Joseph Horn Cloud, and White Lance.
                  Visit the Nebraska State Historical Society website at http://www.nebraskahistory.org

And finally, a personal thank you to Mike Magstadt, for contacting me and pointing me in a good direction. Thanks to you, Mike, the images on this page now have a voice.

 

 


These two images provide a modern day 3D perspective of Wounded Knee. Created by Mike Magstadt. Courtesy of Google Earth.

 


Original page located here


How to cite this web page

MLA Style Citation:
Thomasson, William B. "Images of Wounded Knee (they speak for themselves)."
        14 May 2011. 24 Jun 2011 <http://hoist.hrtc.net/~arabento/woundedknee.htm>.


APA Style Citation:
Thomasson, W. B. (2011, May 14). Images of Wounded Knee (they speak for themselves).
        Retrieved June 24, 2011, from http://hoist.hrtc.net/~arabento/woundedknee.htm


Chicago Style Citation:
Thomasson, William B. "Images of Wounded Knee (they speak for themselves)."
        http://hoist.hrtc.net/~arabento/woundedknee.htm (accessed June 24, 2011).

 

 

 

 

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